Dania Beach Broward's First City Incorporated 1904
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F.A.Q.s

 

Community Development

Frequently Asked Questions

 

 

Q.

Do I need a permit to remove a tree?

A.

It depends on the type, size, and location of the tree. In many cases, a permit is required to remove a tree.   To determine if a tree removal permit is required, please contact Code Compliance Unit at 954-924-6800 x3646

 

Q.

Do I need a license to operate a business in the City?

A.

Yes, a Local Business Tax Receipt is required to conduct any business.  The Local Business Tax Receipt is in addition to a county Local Business Tax Receipt.  Please contact Local Business Tax Receipt Office at 954-924-6800 x3657 regarding Local Business Tax Receipt applications.

 

Q.

How do I know if my business is permitted in the city?

A.

Please contact Planning and Zoning at 954-924-6800 x3793

 

Q.

What if I have questions regarding zoning regulations applicable to existing commercial, industrial, or warehouse buildings?

A.

Please contact Planning and Zoning at 954-924-6800 x3793

 

Q.

What if I have questions regarding zoning regulations concerning a single family home?

A.

  • For questions regarding single family homes (including sheds, additions, fences, swimming pools, patios, etc) please contact Planning and Zoning at 954-924-6800 x3793
  • For questions regarding all other development (apartments, commercial, industrial, and vacant land) please contact the Principal Planner at 954-924-6800 x3704

 

Q.

What if I wish to apply for site plan approval, variance or special exception request, rezoning request, land use plan amendment, or temporary special event?

A.

Please contact the Principal Planner at 954-924-6800 x3704

 

Q.

Whose responsibility is it to repair sidewalks?

A.

It shall be duty of the adjacent property to maintain and keep in repair sidewalks in front of or abutting public streets.

 

Q.

How many dogs can I keep on my property?

A.

It shall be unlawful for any person to keep more than three (3) adult dogs on their property.

 

Q.

Why do I need a permit?

A.

To be sure all your work and material are approved and meet the code.

 

Q.

What do I need a permit to do?

A.

You need a permit to: build a new building; build an addition; build or install a shed; enclose a carport; convert a garage; change doors or windows; remodel the interior of the building; install a canopy; install shutters; repair or replace a roof; change or repair the electric or water service lines; install a security system; install a satellite dish (except mini-dishes); change a water heater; install ANYTHING electric that isn’t just plugged in; build a porch; build a patio; build a screen room; build a pool or spa; install a fence; pour a driveway or sidewalk; apply siding or soffit/fascia; install air conditioning equipment; install or certify a backflow preventer on your water line; add plumbing fixtures; change a sewer line.

 

Q.

What work can I do as a homeowner?

A.

You do not need a license to get a permit to do any work on the single family or duplex home that you own and in which you live. That means your homesteaded property. You can apply for and receive a permit to do your own work on your own home. 

 

Q.

Are there any other places to which I must go?

A.

The primary ‘other place’ is the Broward County Department of Planning and Environmental Protection (DPEP). DPEP requires you to bring your plans for for their review. Not all projects require a visit, mostly new construction, additions and sometimes remodeling. It is best to visit them to let them determine if their review is required.

 

Q.

What paperwork is required?

A.

  • To begin, a permit application is required. You must give us the owner's name and address; the job address; your phone number; the property folio number (Tax ID number from your tax bill); the architect's or engineer's name, address, and phone number (if one was used); the type of work being done; and the cost of the job. For structures or roofs we need the area ( in square feet). For docks, seawalls, fences and the like we need to know how long and how high (in feet). If the work is more than $2,500.00 in value, we need to know the mortgage company name and address, if it's a new loan. Most of this information is required by State law. We enforce not only local building code, but city ordinances and state and federal laws.
  • For electrical, plumbing or A/C permits we need to know the specifics of the work you are performing.
  • Any new construction outside of the existing building walls (additions, carports, sheds), as well as driveway or fence permits, requires a signed, sealed survey. You may submit only one signed, sealed original plus 2 copies, and your original will be returned to you.  You also need a site plan, which shows where the new work is going to go.
  • Plans are required for all construction work. Plans consist of a floor plan (bird's eye) view, sections (slices through the work), and elevations (on the outside - looking in). All work which consists of new walls and or roofs (sheds included) must be certified (drawn, signed, and sealed) by an architect or engineer. Any other work can be drawn by the owner, if the job value is less than $5,000.00.
  • Products approvals for any doors, window shutters are also required, and they must be reviewed and signed by the architect (if one is being used).
  • Two copies of each item must be submitted. After the review is complete and the permit issued, we keep one set and you get the other set to keep on the job site.
  • If the value of the project is $2,500.00 or more, you must record a "Notice of Commencement" at the Broward County Clerk's Office. This helps protect you from paying twice for material or labor.
  • Some permits require somewhat different paper packages to be submitted, but that's more than we have room for here. Specialty items can be discussed with us as your needs arise. 

 

Q.

How long is the review process?

A.

  • When you first submit your application package, our clerks will check to see if your application form is complete, if you've gone through the outside agencies, and if your plans are basically complete. It's not for them to review the plans to see if they're complete or correct, he plans reviewers will do that.
  • If it's a small job, like a roof, or some electric, A/C, or plumbing work, only one inspector needs to review the application. If everything is all right, it may be ready within 3 days.  But, a lot depends on how many applications have been submitted. The usual turnaround time is 3-5 days. It might be quicker, but that's a rare treat,  and 3 days is a good guess of time if everything is correct on the application and plan. If not, you'll be called and told what the problems are. You then need to take it back, make the corrections, and re-submit it.
  • Projects such as fences, driveways, sheds and such require at least 2 inspectors review.  The times and processes are similar to these outlined above.
  • All other construction requires review by 3 to 6 inspectors including Zoning, Fire and Public Services besides the Building Division review. If all is OK, and no corrections are necessary, turnaround is 3-6 weeks. If there are problems and corrections are necessary, the plans must be taken out, corrected, and resubmitted. Again, review time is 2-4 weeks.
  • When all is well and the permit application is approved, you will get a call from one of our clerks to tell you it's time to come and visit us to pickup your permit and what the cost is.

 

Q.

What is the inspection process like?

A.

  • When requesting an inspection, call prior to 2:00 p.m. the day before you want the inspection. We will need to know the owner's name, the address, permit number, type of inspection, and the name of the caller. You may get "the machine" when you call for the inspection, but that's OK, leave all that information, and you'll be put on the list for tomorrow.
  • The inspectors can’t usually make appointments, but if you call between 7:30 a.m. and 8:00 a.m., you may be able to speak to them before they hit the streets.
    Please call 954-924-6805 with the following extensions:
    Structural, x3653
    Electrical, x3655
    Plumbing, x3654
    Fire, x3739
    Zoning, x3793
  • The inspections include but are not limited to: plumbing ground rough; electric ground rough; A/C ground rough; footer; slab; columns; tie-beam; roof sheathing; tin cap; wall sheathing; wire lathe; rough electric; rough A/C; plumbing top out; framing; bucks; windows/doors; framing; insulation; drywall; final; final; final; and final.
  • If all you did was change your water heater, or put up a fence, we will only come out once when you call for the final inspection.
  • Very Important: Get that final inspection, and make sure it's approved. If not, and the permit expires, and the matter could result in a Code Compliance Violation Notice being issued. 
  • The permit is good for 180 from the date that it is issued. After that, the permit remains active for 90 day increments between inspections. That means between APPROVED inspections.  Notice that word.  Because you receive an inspection and fail does not mean you can wait another 3 months. The idea is to get a permit, do your work, get your inspections and get a final.
  • If you're building a new house or addition, you will need to get a new survey done and submitted for review before you get the inspection for the tie-beam (for block construction) or before the slab inspection (for wood frame). This is how we make sure that you put the building in the right place. It is easier to move form boards than it is to move concrete.
  • Each approved inspection allows you to move forward to your next phase of work. You can not get your slab inspection approved without having gotten the plumbing in the ground approved. Likewise with the framing: when it is approved, it is OK to hang drywall, but if we did not approve the wiring first, well, better to not have to take the walls apart.
  • You should always keep your permit card where it can be seen so it is apparent that your work is permitted. When we come out to inspect, the card and the approved plan need to be out where we can see them. After we leave, you can take the plans back in so they won't get rained on or stolen.
  • You do not need to be home for the inspection, unless of course, the inspectors need to get in your house, in the instance of say, a final A/C, or water heater, or the like. The inspector will not enter your house if you are not there, so don't leave a note and the key!
  • If it is a roof inspection, you need to supply a ladder. A good one, that is at least 30" higher than the edge of the roof. And please - hold the dogs.

 

Q.

What is a red tag?

A.

  • This is a Notice of Violation. This is to tell you what was done improperly on the job.  THIS IS NOT A PUNISHMENT! We want to get your job done right, not to make life difficult. It could be minor, such as the plans were not there for the inspector (see Chapter Seven). Or maybe you did not do something the way the plan says, or the code wasn’t being followed. Or maybe the work was just so bad it needs to come apart and start all over.
  • Whatever the reason, the inspector will explain on the tag what is wrong and how to fix it. When it is done, you call for the inspection again.
  • You may have to pay a re-inspection fee. THIS IS NOT A FINE! Remember, your permit fee pays for us to visit and inspect and it allows for only so many inspections. If we have to come out a 2nd (or hopefully not a 3rd) time, you need to pay for that extra service.
  • You need to be sure that you make all the corrections listed on the tag. If it is not all corrected, you may get another notice. 
  • If you have to pay the fee, you must do so before you request the re-inspection. The inspection request will not be taken, and the inspector will not re-inspect, until the fee is paid.
  • The Red Tag is nothing to be ashamed of. If you didn't know, we will help you to learn, and once corrected move the job along.
  • If you find, for whatever reason, you must build differently from the plan, go back to the architect, have the plan changed, submit 2 copies to the Division for review, then get your copy out on the job. Make it legal, and make the paper match the project.

 

Q.

When is the job is complete?

A.

  • You have gotten all your inspections approved and you are ready to move in, turn it on, and enjoy. For your new construction or addition we need a final flood elevation certificate. This is prepared by your surveyor, and submitted to us. We in turn provide this to FEMA, who make sure everything is built high enough so we can get cheaper flood insurance.
  • If it is new, we will call for the power company to turn on the electric, providing the final electrical inspection is approved. Be sure you request all final inspections (building, electric, plumbing, A/C, fire) and they are all approved.
  • Then we will issue you a Certificate of Occupancy (for all new work and additions) or in certain instances a Certificate of Completion for smaller work.

  

Q.

Hiring a contractor?

A.

  • Under your homeowner permit, you are entitled to do the work on your house. You can have friends and family help, but you can't hire someone to do the work. That is called "aiding and abetting" an unlicensed contractor. And, that is illegal. You can hire a licensed contractor to work for you. That person will have all the proper licensing and insurance, and will basically be a subcontractor to you. That's legal.
  • If some one says "You get the permit as an owner and you pay me to do the work", start running. This person may be an unlicensed contractor, and is just the kind of situation we are trying to keep you out of. Remember, when you are the permit holder, you are the one responsible for all of the work and, if there is a problem, we come after you, not the person that you hired.
  • Also, there is no such thing as a Handyman License. When you ask for a license, you should see a certification issued by either the State of Florida or Broward County. It will say either Certified Contractor, or Certificate of Competency. A Local Business Tax Receipt is a business tax and is NOT a license to contract.
  • We cannot make recommendations for contractors or other professionals. We may, on request, provide several names to you from which you may make a selection.

 

Q.

What will happen if the homeowner/contractor doesn’t get a permit?

A.

Failure to obtain a required permit will result in a Code Compliance Violation being issued. The respondent must then not only go through the normal process of obtaining a permit but will also be required to pay twice the normal permit fee. If a permit is not obtained, the respondent will be brought before the Code Compliance Board.  The Code Compliance Board could order a fine that could be as high as $250.00 per day until a permit is obtained and the work is inspected and approved. If the fine is unpaid, it will become a lien to the property that will need to be paid at some time in the future. The unpaid fine will not allow any refinancing or sale of the property. If the property is not homesteaded, the City may choose to foreclose on the unpaid lien. If the work is not permitted, inspected and approved, the City may seek an Unsafe Structures action and force the work to be removed.

 

 


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City of Dania Beach  •  100 W. Dania Beach Blvd.  •  Dania Beach, FL 33004  •  954-924-6800  •  Fax: 954-921-2604